rsyslog: integrating Windows Event Log (via UDP)

This tutorial tells how to integrate data from Windows event log into our rsyslog configuration. We will do this integration via the UDP syslog protocol so that we finally can show this in a real case. No advanced topics are covered. We use CentOS 7 and Windows Server 2012 (because it still is in more widespread use). This is part of a rsyslog tutorial series.

Scope

We will introduce Windows Machine W into our configuration and make it forward its Event Log messages via UDP to LC. With the setup done in our last tutorial, LC will then relay the messages to syslog server LR. The choice if UDP is arbitrary. The intent is to finally have a system sending via UDP so that we can show how the configuration works. For practical deployments, TCP is probably a better option.

Note: you do not necessarily need to have followed the previous tutorial. Basically you just need to have a syslog server up and running to which we can send messages.

To configure the scenario, we only need to touch W. The rest of our tutorial scenario will remain as-is because it already provides the necessary functionality. When finished, our base lab scenario will be in the following configuration:

Note that we still do not configure any system to actually send data to LC. This will be done the next tutorial. Note that if you did not complete the last tutorial, it may be wise to have a look at it. We will work with the configuration it generated. Continue reading “rsyslog: integrating Windows Event Log (via UDP)”

rsyslog: relay messages only (no local storage)

This tutorials tells how rsyslog is configured to accept syslog messages over the network via UDP. No advanced topics are covered. We use CentOS 7. This is part of a rsyslog tutorial series.

Scope

We will configure LC to only relay messages received via UDP but not store them locally.  Locally-generated messages will still be stored inside local log files. They, too, will be forwarded to LR. This is a very common use case. We still do not configure any sender to connect to LC.

To do all of this, we need to modify only LC local configuration. As such, our base lab scenario will remain in the following configuration:

Note that we still do not configure any system to actually send data to LC. This will be done the next tutorial. Note that if you did not complete the last tutorial, it may be wise to have a look at it. We will work with the configuration it generated. Continue reading “rsyslog: relay messages only (no local storage)”

rsyslog beginner’s tutorial series

This multi-step tutorial series targets rsyslog beginners. It covers typical configuration steps which are done with minimal effort. I found that for beginners it is often very important to provide precise instructions for their specific environment. As such, I focus on CentOS 7, which is quite popular in enterprise environments.

Final setup at end of basic tutorial set.

If you do not usually use CentOS 7, I still suggest to download and install it on two lab machines. This permits you to follow the tutorial in exact steps. Once you know what you do, it should be fairly easy to translate that to other distributions like Ubuntu.

Note: I am currently writing the tutorials, so they will grow for the time being. The basic set will have around 10 tutorials (I already have the full outline).

Available Tutorials

For best experience, read tutorials in given order:

  1. Overview of lab environment (not yet done)
  2. configure a TCP syslog server
  3. forward messages to remote server (via TCP syslog)
  4. configure a UDP syslog server
  5. rsyslog: relay messages only (no local storage)
  6. rsyslog: integrating Windows Event Log (via UDP)

Note that if you are interested in a specific topic, you can also pick tutorials out of the order. Be warned, though, that there is some inter-dependency between the tutorials. For example, for forwarding messages, a server is needed. The forwarding tutorial as such assumes that the server was properly created. In suggested sequence, this is ensured.

There exist also some utility tutorials to help you understand the operating environment. They are linked to from the appropriate places.

Additional Info

Why is this tutorial series created and hosted here? Find the answer in this article. If you are interested in contributing to the effort, please let me know. Feedback of any kind is also very welcome. You can also use the comment fields to provide it.

rsyslog: configure syslog UDP reception

This tutorials tells how rsyslog is configured to accept syslog messages over the network via UDP. No advanced topics are covered. We use CentOS 7. This is part of a rsyslog tutorial series.

Scope

We will configure the relay system to accept UDP based syslog from remote ends.  We do not, however, configure any sender to connect to it. We will use LC as UDP server, just so that we get some more variety into our lab with limited systems. In our base lab scenario, this will lead to the following configuration:

Note that we will accept incoming logs and store them into the same location as we do for local logs. Handling them different will be part of a later tutorial. Continue reading “rsyslog: configure syslog UDP reception”

How to start, stop and query the status of rsyslog (on a systemd system)

This short tutorial explains everyday service management. While it claims to address management of rsyslog, it actually describes the tools for all services. The tutorial is written for CentOS 7, but should work equally well on other systemd-based systems like CentOS 8, recent Fedora, recent Debian and recent Ubuntu. Continue reading “How to start, stop and query the status of rsyslog (on a systemd system)”

rsyslog: forward messages to remote server

This tutorials tells how rsyslog is configured to send syslog messages over the network via TCP to a remote server. No advanced topics are covered. We use CentOS 7. This is part of a rsyslog tutorial series.

Scope

We will configure an end node (here: LR) to send messages via TCP to a remote syslog server. We do not apply local pre-filtering and we want to make only minimal changes to the CentOS 7 default configuration. In our base lab scenario, this will lead to the following configuration:

Continue reading “rsyslog: forward messages to remote server”

rsyslog: configure syslog TCP reception

This tutorials tells how rsyslog is configured to accept syslog messages over the network via TCP. No advanced topics are covered. We use CentOS 7. This is part of a rsyslog tutorial series.

Scope

We will configure the relay system to accept TCP based syslog from remote ends. We do not, however, configure any sender to connect to it. In our base lab scenario, this will lead to the following configuration:

Note that we will accept incoming logs and store them into the same location as we do for local logs. Handling them different will be part of a later tutorial. Continue reading “rsyslog: configure syslog TCP reception”

Tutorials for rsyslog

While I have been in Tallinn to give some lectures about syslog technology in general as well as rsyslog in specific I had the idea to use that opportunity to think about crafting rsyslog tutorials in general.

For the practical session at TALTECH IT-College I have identified a couple of typical configuration tasks. As experience shows, to carry them out successfully not only rsyslog knowledge is required but general sysadmin know-how as well. Continue reading “Tutorials for rsyslog”